Tendons, Joints and comebacks

Discussion in 'Resistance Training' started by Coinflip, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. Coinflip

    Coinflip Member

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    After a protracted period trying to recover from injury (3 or so years), I’m back doing the training I can. I’m starting light and will incrementally build weight.

    My question... assuming that my body as previously accustomed to moving significant weight, do ligaments, tendons and joints regress from their adapted state? For example, muscle that isn’t consistently trained will atrophy. Do ligaments, tendons and joints have a similar regression?
     
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  3. hashish

    hashish meow

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    @scump help this guy out.

    im not very good on the subject... but...
    as far as i know, TIME and REST and then PHYSIO would have helped heal them as much as they possibly can.
    being 3 years, i would have hoped you werent lazy with your recovery.
    that being said, as your muscles get stronger, so should your ligaments and tendons.. BUT from what i knew is that they take longer to adapt to the strength/weight compared to muscles...
    also higher weight will put more stress on joints, probs more noticeable for the older ppl, or big boyz.

    i guess with the right physio, strength training and taking care of your self, you will have less risk. genetics would probably play a factor in there too.

    i could be all wrong lol, hopefully someone else chimes in so we can both learn a thing or 2.
     
  4. Coinflip

    Coinflip Member

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    Thanks for the reply. My main concern is that my strength is going to rapidly bounce back. If ligaments and joints atrophy, then I’ll be at increased risk of injury as the weights stuck up, with muscle gains rapidly outstripping joints and ligaments. However, if joints and tendons retain their integrity through a lay-off, then I can push for growth because the structural adaption has already occurred. Perhaps I’m overthinking the issue, but I haven’t found any literature on the topic...
     
  5. hashish

    hashish meow

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    Could be over thinking it..
    But i dont know your history of injury, so i cant say.
    Its normal to be weary and careful after coming back from injury.

    You could take it slow and see how you go..
    But if your planning on AAS... Then u might want to be even more careful.
     
  6. Coinflip

    Coinflip Member

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    YOLO... I’ll just max out and see what happens.

    Just kidding... old enough to know better... sadly... at my age, AAS are definitely in the mix, but that’s building from a long history of training. I’ve never been a big rig... more the military type.
     
  7. scump

    scump Well-Known Member

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    Yes they definitely do regress. Just like you can strengthen them by training them.

    If you try mash out stupid numbers too fast you will likely just re-injure yourself. Plus your body has its limits on how it can progress anyway, just adopt a linear progression plan and take advantage of your muscle memory.

    If you're planning AAS, save it for when you need it man, you should be progressing good now you're back into training, when that plateaus then consider AAS. If you think your strength will come back quickly include some mobility work as well to support the joints.
     
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  8. Coinflip

    Coinflip Member

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    Thanks for the advice. I’ll take it onboard. Cheers, Coin
     

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